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Marcio Napoli’s travel and street photography is a magnificent example of how engaging and powerful real life images can be.

Just look at these photographs and notice that it seems like the photographer is peeking on his subjects. Check out his full portfolio for an overview of his inspiring work.

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Greg Vore’s brilliant talent to capture stunning images is even more obvious in his India album where his amazing shots reveal the colors and culture of this magical land.

The photographer has worked for numerous clients and his work has been shown in Vogue, Vanity Fair, New York Times, The New Yorker and many more publications.

Check out his site for more outstanding photography!
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A charming and sensitive focus on Albinos by photographer Gustavo Lacerda. Colors, expressions, everything looks poetically coordinated and inspiring!

Visit his site and view more of his creative photo projects.
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Elene Usdin is no doubt one of the most inspiring artists I’ve recently discovered. Her portfolio is rich in concept, technique and most importantly creativity & imagination!

It was very difficult for me to choose a theme from her projects portfolio. Her “Femmes d’ interior” series focuses on the interpretation of women’s role in society through a deconstructive and symbolical manner. As the artist notes: “In this series of pictures on “Femmes d’intérieur”, I want to play with the codes, to re-arrange them, giving a cushion or a chair or a pair of shoes the same attention as the subject. It’s my way of depersonalizing the woman, of turning her into (perhaps what she always was): the object, the woman-object. Upending things in effect poses the question: what is the social status of a woman? The reference to “great classics” of painting is a good way to illustrate how a woman is corseted by her rank and the social position of her husband or her own family. The idea of painting “in the style of”, copying the classics, is a way of making each photograph unqiue. It’s an additional way of personifying each of these women, of giving them back their difference and their originality.”
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Embodiment is a Project by photographer Molly Landreth and video artist Amelia Tovey that explores the feeling of being gay in America today. A series of emotive portrait shots are captured aiming to convey reality and document sometimes hidden love stories.

The project has gained international recognition and has been supported and funded by various public and private donors.
Molly has received her BA in Studio Art and an MFA in photography and she lives and creates in Washington.
 
 
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Known for her humanitarian photographs, Stephanie Sinclair has been awarded numerous times for her work on gender and human rights issues around the world.
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Shortly after college she started working for the Chicago Tribune which sent her to cover the start of the war in Iraq. She eventually moved to Iraq and then to Lebanon for 6 years as a freelancer.
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Photos from the VII Photo Agency
 
 
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Born in Minneapolis, Laura Swanson is now based in Providence, Rhode Island. Her photo series “splices”, “canonical portraits”, “deformities”, “embarrassments”, “sitcoms & romcoms” and “anti-self portraits” are very interesting conceptual experiments which trigger the viewer’s eye by setting humanist questions.
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More particularly, the artist’s statement about the “Anti-Self-Portraits (2005-2008)”: Part biography, these images represent my discomfort with being looked at and wishing I could hide. Part fantasy, these images position the viewer as the perpetrator of an invasion of privacy. The psychological play between the viewer and myself is what I am most interested in - I am drawing attention to the fact that I am denying something from the viewer. Am I reproaching the viewer's gaze? Or am I simply acknowledging the moment of recognition? The idea of hiding to acknowledge the act of looking is fascinating to me. The concealment of my face is also important to the depersonalization of the exchange. By removing identity and having the shape of my body stand in for the idea of difference, there is more room for thoughts about how one looks at another. The exchange is not just about me and the viewer anymore - it has the opportunity to open up into a broader conversation about how difference is looked at”.
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Recognized as one of the most talented artists in the field of humanist photography, Willy Ronis is known by his ability to convey waves of nostalgia for the urban community of 40’s and 50’s through his black and white images.

" Dividing my time between assignments and playing truant by image-hunting was difficult, but in the last account it protected me from routine, and I have experienced by turns periods of anguish and moments of extraordinary happiness. Je ne regrette rien" [as quoted by the artist]
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